Right Now in Stuff You Missed in History Class

Over the course of several days in 1934, Adolf Hitler eliminated all of his political enemies, enabling him to declare himself Fuhrer.

Copernicus

In addition to being an astronomer, Copernicus was also a mathematician, a doctor, and wrote a manuscript on devaluation of currency.

Six Impossible Episodes: Soldiers, Snipers and Spies

This installment of our impossible episodes series features a set of stories that are all about front-line heroism. Most of them are listener requests.

Horace de Vere Cole and the Dreadnought Hoax

In his most brazen prank, Cole schemed to gain access to the HMS Dreadnought by getting his friends to pretend they were Abyssinian royalty.

The Philadelphia MOVE Bombing

After a protracted, contentious relationship with Philadelphia police, the MOVE organization's home was bombed in 1985.

The Kentucky Derby's First 50 Years

Since its inception, the Derby has become the nation's most famous and prestigious horse racing event.

The Cato Street Conspiracy

In response to the problems urbanization and mechanization brought to Great Britain, a radical group plotted to kill the Prime Minister's cabinet.

Abbott and Costello, Part 2

Abbott and Costello made it big in Hollywood during WWII, but the later part of their career together was beset by tragedy and problems.

Abbott and Costello, Part 1

The comedy team of Abbott and Costello created some of the most memorable sketches in history. Part 1 covers their rise to fame.

The Tuskegee Syphilis Study

The Tuskegee Syphilis Study is one of the modern world's most infamous incidents of unethical medical research.

Walt Whitman, Poet of Democracy

Whitman is often touted as the best and most important poet in U.S. history, but he also worked as a teacher and a journalist. And his poetry career didn't start out particularly well.

A Brief History of Foreign Food in the U.S.

One of the most diverse things about the U.S. is its food industry. But foods brought to the U.S. via immigration were initially viewed suspiciously.

Three Nuclear Close Calls

There have been many moments in history when the world came perilously close to a full-scale nuclear war, due to false alarms or miscommunication.

Prospect Park, Part 2

In our second episode about Brooklyn's 150-year-old public park, we interview three guests about the park's history and restoration.

Prospect Park, Part 1

Brooklyn's massive public green space tells the historical story of its community. From an undeveloped tract of land, the space was developed to become an Olmsted and Vaux masterpiece.

Live From Salt Lake Comic Con FanX: H.P. Lovecraft

Writer H.P. Lovecraft created worlds and stories that continue to be influential more than 80 years after his death.

Aphra Behn, Writer and Spy

There's really not a lot concretely known about the life of Aphra Behn, who was the first woman in English literature to have made her living writing.

Mongolian Princess Khutulun

Khutulun's story is a little bit cloudy. It's many hundreds of years old, and accounts of her life involve both propaganda and an outsider’s view.

Jules Cotard and the Syndrome Named After Him

Jules Cotard was the first psychiatrist to write about the cluster of symptoms that would come to be called “Walking Corpse Syndrome.” But his work was unfinished, and left a great deal of room for debate about it among his colleagues.

A Note on Dr. James Barry

We've received several requests for a podcast on Dr. James Barry, but the video prompting those requests has a number of issues.