Marie Antoinette

Léonard Autié: Hair, Grandeur and Revolution, Pt. 2

As Louis XVI's time as king was less and less stable in the face of the French Revolution, Léonard stepped away from the royal family and into his own business ventures. But his loyalty to the crown would forever tie his fate to that of the nobility.

Léonard Autié: Hair, Grandeur and Revolution, Pt. 1

Marie Antoinette's hairdresser set the styles of France during King Louis XVI's reign. But when he first arrived in Paris, he had almost nothing. Just how did he manage such a meteoric rise?

The Women's March on Versailles

In 1789, a group of protesters -- mostly women -- marched from Paris to Versailles to pressure King Louis XVI to address France's food shortage.

Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun

No starving artist, Vigée Le Brun was the first woman to ever become a court painter in France when she was commissioned to paint Marie Antoinette. She painted royalty and nobility throughout Europe, even as her personal life had its ups and downs.

Rose Bertin: The First Fashion Designer

The legendary wardrobe of Marie-Antoinette has been criticized, envied and discussed to no end. But where did all those glorious clothes come from? In large part, they were the work of Rose Bertin, a milliner who found herself the stylist to the queen. Read the show notes here.

Is there a money pit on Oak Island?

In 1795, a farm boy named Daniel McGinnis found a strange depression in the ground on an island in Nova Scotia's Mahone Bay. As he and his friends began to dig, they realized they'd stumbled on much more than an ordinary hole. Tune in and learn more.

Ghosts of History: Versailles

In 1901, two women visiting Versailles lost their way and met a series of strange, anachronistic characters. Looking back on the event, the women became certain they had slipped through time into 1789. Learn more in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

How the French Revolution Worked

Several factors contributed to the French Revolution. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn how an incompetent monarchy, the age of Enlightenment and widespread famine created the perfect storm for a country-wide revolution.

Did Marie Antoinette really tell French peasants to eat cake?

Marie Antoinette was only ten when Rousseau published the famous 'let them eat cake' quote. Check out our HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about what this statement actually meant -- whether or not Marie actually said it.