Epidemics

The Flu Epidemic of 1918

The 1918 Spanish flu epidemic, which killed somewhere between 20 million and 50 million people, started just as World War I was winding down. Nobody cured it, or really successfully treated it. A fifth of the people in the world got the flu during the pandemic. Read the show notes here.

John Snow's Ghost Map

In this episode of Stuff You Missed in History Class, Katie and Sarah discuss Dr. John Snow's famous "ghost map" and work tracing a cholera outbreak in Victorian London.

This episode, the first in a five-part interview series with former President Jimmy Carter, details the Carter Center's work on the eradication of Guinea worm disease.

The idea for the Panama Canal goes back to 1534, when the Spanish surveyed the area. However, the canal wasn't built for centuries, and it was an arduous task. Learn more about the malaria plaguing canal builders in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

In the summer of 1518, a woman in Strasbourg, France started dancing -- and didn't stop. By the end of the week, the compulsion to dance had spread to hundreds of people. Learn more about the dancing sickness in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

How Typhoid Mary Worked

Historians agree that Typhoid Mary really existed -- but who was she, and how did she come to infect so many people? Tune in and learn more about Typhoid Mary in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

When the Black Death swept across Europe, it killed an estimated 25 million people -- one third of Europe's total population. Tune in and learn more about the lasting effects of the Black Death in this HowStuffWorks podcast.