The study of the heavens is one of humanity's oldest pursuits, and it's still a work in progress. In this episode, Deblina and Sarah explore the details of five amazing astronomical discoveries, beginning with the work of Copernicus.

Tycho Brahe:  An Astronomer's Untimely Demise

Tycho Brahe is hailed as an influential astronomer, but why? Tune in and learn how this groundbreaking astronomer lost his nose, built the world's first observatory and met with an untimely demise in this podcast.

The hit show "Lost" is replete with historical name-dropping, but who are all these people mentioned in the show? In this episode, our resident history buffs crack the case and track down some of the historical names used in "Lost."

When Napoleon planned a secret mission to Egypt, he authorized three men to create a Commission of Sciences and Arts. However, the commission's 151 members soon learned the mission wasn't what they'd expected. Tune in and learn more in this podcast.

Who was Emanuel Swedenborg?

When the philosopher Emanuel Swedenborg sought mechanical explanations for nature, he found himself struggling with his faith as he searched for evidence of the human soul. But what happened next? Tune in and learn more in this podcast.

The Ada Lovelace Episode: Who was the Enchantress of Numbers?

The first computer programmer was a woman named Ada Lovelace. Learn how the daughter of Lord Byron -- one of the most famous poets in the Western world -- moved out of her father's shadow and became a herald of the electronic age in this episode.

Archimedes' death ray is one of history's most fabled legendary weapons -- but what was it? Was it even real? Listen in as Candace and Jane sift through the legends and find the facts behind the ancient death ray in this podcast from

Like any other discipline, history often becomes a matter of interpretation. Check in with HowStuffWorks' resident history experts as they explore the phenomenon of revisionist history in this podcast.

Prior to the modern discovery of the Rosetta stone, Ancient Egypt was an enigma. Even many pre-Napoleonic Egyptians had no concept of their forbearers' culture. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the Rosetta Stone.

Known today as Egypt, Kemet is one of the longest-lived cultures in the world. The great Greek scholars studied at the Kemetic temple-universities, and based their learning on the Kemetic system. Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn more.