19th Century

In the 19th century, Britain tried to remedy a trade deficit with China by hooking the country on opium. Tensions rose as more and more Chinese citizens became opium addicts, eventually leading to war. Learn more about the Opium Wars in this episode.

The Ada Lovelace Episode: Who was the Enchantress of Numbers?

The first computer programmer was a woman named Ada Lovelace. Learn how the daughter of Lord Byron -- one of the most famous poets in the Western world -- moved out of her father's shadow and became a herald of the electronic age in this episode.

How Lord Byron Worked

Whether the topic is Lucrezia Borgia or Frankenstein, Lord Byron keeps popping up in podcasts. Who was this poet, and why is he associated with so many historical figures? Join Katie and Sarah as they take a look back at the incomparable Lord Byron.

Over the course of her life, Marie Laveau wielded enormous influence as the notorious Voodoo Queen of New Orleans -- but how much of her story is true? Join Sarah and Katie as they unravel the fact and fiction surrounding the legendary Marie Levaeu.

The Birth of Frankenstein and the Vampyre

With Halloween looming, Sarah and Katie travel back in time to explore the historic challenge that led to the creation of Frankenstein and the vampiric Lord Ruthven. Tune in to learn more about the birth of these intentionally horrific creatures.

The outspoken statesman and abolitionist Charles Sumner served as a senator from 1851-1874. Learn how Senator Sumner's 1865 protest against the Kansas-Nebraska Act prompted one of the most violent altercations in senatorial history.

How the Shootout at the OK Corral Worked

The infamous shootout at the OK Corral has been immortalized in American culture -- but what's the real story behind the legend? Join Katie and Sarah as they explore the events that led up to this famous shootout in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

John Snow's Ghost Map

In this episode of Stuff You Missed in History Class, Katie and Sarah discuss Dr. John Snow's famous "ghost map" and work tracing a cholera outbreak in Victorian London.

At the turn of the century, New York paperboys formed the backbone of the city's paper distribution network. When publishers increased the cost of wholesale papers in 1899, the newsboys went on strike. Learn more in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

After he joined the Navy at 14, Sir John Franklin traveled the world and eventually became the governor of Tanzania. In 1846, he set off to explore the Arctic -- and never returned. Learn more about the mystery in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.