The Crayola Crayon Story


OCT 7 1970, OCT 20 1970, OCT 21 1970; Scarcely a month old, Park Hill Day Care Center at 6430 E. 32nd Ave. Parkway is getting a big play from children in the area whose parents have taken advantage of the new facility. Some of the children at the center are Joe Garcia, 3, above, busily engaged in coloring a picture; Stacey Amory, 4, and Sharon Grayson, above right, using playground climbing apparatus; Trey Boston, 4 lower left, getting fistful of crayons; Stacey Amory and Edward Garcia, 4, center, in classroom learning project, and Leon Jackson, 3, in sandpile with oversized shoes.; (Photo By Oliva Fall/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

It's now a childhood classic, but the modern Crayola crayon has roots in the same company where carbon black was made for car tires at the turn of the 20th century. But people were creating art with colored implements before Binney and Smith made theirs.

Circa 1970: Joe Garcia, 3, busily engaged in coloring a picture at Park Hill Day Care Center, Denver, Colorado. (Photo By Oliva Fall/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Topics in this Podcast: 19th century, 20th century, art