The Minuscule Science of Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek


Seventeenth-century portrait of Antonie van Leeuwenhoek by Jan Vercolje. Public domain.

Leeuwenhoek wasn’t REALLY a scientist -- he had no formal training. But he made dozens of scientific discoveries. He’s credited with discovering microscopic life in a variety of forms, using lenses he ground himself.

Holly's Research:

  • The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. “Antonie van Leeuwenhoek.” Encyclopædia Britannica. November 16, 2017. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Antonie-van-Leeuwenhoek
  • Poppick, Laura. “The Long, Winding Tale of Sperm Science.” Smithsonian. June 7, 2017. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/scientists-finally-unravel-mysteries-sperm-180963578/
  • BBC. “Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (1632 - 1723).” http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/van_leeuwenhoek_antonie.shtml
  • Logan, Liz. “Early Microscopes Revealed a New World of Tiny Living Things.” Smithsonian. April 27, 2016. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/early-microscopes-revealed-new-world-tiny-living-things-180958912/
  • Robertson, Lesley, et al. “Antoni van Leeuwenhoek: Master of the Minuscule.” Brill. 2016.
  • Dobell, Clifford. “Antony van Leeuwenhoek and his ‘Little animals.’” Harcourt, Brace and Co. New York. 1932. Accessed online: https://archive.org/details/antonyvanleeuwen00dobe

Topics in this Podcast: biographies, science history, 17th century, 18th century, netherlands, European history