Alice Hamilton and the Birth of Occupational Medicine


Alice Hamilton Public domain

Dr. Alice Hamilton was a trailblazer in science and medicine, and dedicated her life to improving the workplace standards for laborers in an effort to reduce illnesses that came from working with toxic chemicals.

Holly's Research:

  • Corn, Jacquelin Karnell. “Hamilton, Alice.” American National Biography. February 2000. http://www.anb.org/view/10.1093/anb/9780198606697.001.0001/anb-9780198606697-e-1200366.
  • “OSH Act of 1970.” United States Department of Labor. https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/oshact/completeoshact
  • The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). “Alice Hamilton, M.D. (February 27, 1869 – September 22,1970).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. April 26, 2012.
  • Ginsberd, Judah. “Alice Hamilton and the Development of Occupational Medicine.” Sept. 21, 2002. American Chemical Society. https://www.acs.org/content/dam/acsorg/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/alicehamilton/alice-hamilton-and-the-development-of-occupational-medicine-commemorative-booklet.pdf
  • American Chemical Society National Historic Chemical Landmarks. Alice Hamilton and the Development of Occupational Medicine. http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/alicehamilton.html
  • Sicherman, Barbara. “Alice Hamilton: A Life in Letters.” Harvard University Press. 1984.
  • “Alice Hamilton.” National Women’s Hall of Fame. https://www.womenofthehall.org/inductee/alice-hamilton/
  • Swaby, Rachel. “Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science and the World.” Broadway Books. 2015.

Topics in this Podcast: U.S. history, labor, workplace safety, Chicago, World War I, Hull House, medical history, biographies, women, 20th century