Show Notes: The Spanish Flu

Tracy Wilson

Lawrence, Massachusetts: Fresh air cure for the Spanish influenza. Nurses, a patient, and an armed soldier stand outside rows of hospital tents outdoors in the sun. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS Lawrence, Massachusetts: Fresh air cure for the Spanish influenza. Nurses, a patient, and an armed soldier stand outside rows of hospital tents outdoors in the sun. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

We're back to normal episodes again with this week's selection from the listener mailbag. In 1918 and 1919, a fifth of the world's population got the flu. For many of them, it developed into a terrifying pneumonia that could kill within hours. Somewhere between 20 million and 50 million people died - a death toll that dwarfed that of World War I, which was winding down just as the flu struck.

Our listener mail is from Sarah about our episode on foot binding.

For more knowledge: How the Flu Works

Episode download link: The Flu Epidemic of 1918

My research:

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