Show Notes: The Bawdy House Riot of 1668

Tracy Wilson

'The sailor's revenge, or the Strand in an uproar...', 1749. A crowd of seamen makes a bonfire of the fittings of brothels, presumably in the Strand. To be clear: This is a later brothel riot than the one we discuss today. Photo by Guildhall Library & Art Gallery/Heritage Images/Getty Images

In early modern London, the thing for apprentices to do on Shrove Tuesday was to go pull down some brothels. But in 1668, the traditional bawdy house riot took a turn - it took place after Lent rather than before, it got much larger, and it led to people being hanged, drawn and quartered for high treason. In today's podcast, we talk about why.

Our listener mail follows our "Unearthed! in 2015" episodes. Katie writes about the Slave Wrecks Project and the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Anne writes about repatriation and the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act.

Episode link: The Bawdy House Riots of 1668

  • Harris, Tim. "The Bawdy House Riots of 1668." The Historical Journal. Vol. 29, No. 3. 1896. Via JSTOR. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2639047
  • Mowry, Melissa. "DRESSING UP AND DRESSING DOWN: Prostitution, Pornography, and the Seventeenth-Century English Textile Industry." Journal of Women's History 11.3 (1999): 78. General OneFile. Web. 14 Jan. 2016.
  • Mowry, Melissa. "Thieves, bawds, and counterrevolutionary fantasies: The Life and Death of Mrs. Mary Frith." Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 5.1 (2005): 26+. General OneFile. Web. 14 Jan. 2016.
  • Pepys, Samuel. "The Diary of Samuel Pepys." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/03/24/ and http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/03/25/
  • Romack, Katherine. "Striking the posture of a whore: the Bawdy House Riots and the 'antitheatrical prejudice'." Genders 50 (2009): NA>. General OneFile. Web. 14 Jan. 2016.

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