Show Notes: Rosa Parks Part 1

Tracy Wilson

Rosa Parks with attorney Charles D. Langford after her arrest with other African-American leaders for boycotting buses. Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS 22 Feb 1956, Montgomery, Alabama, USA --- Rosa Parks with her attorney Charles D. Langford after her arrest with other African-American leaders for boycotting buses in a mass protest against bus segregation. Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Anyone who has ever studied the civil rights movement in the United States can surely tell one story about Rosa Parks: She refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a bus one day. But the elementary-school version of that story is (of course) enormously oversimplified, and it glosses over Rosa Parks' lifelong work as an activist for equal rights. She's known as the mother of the civil rights movement for much more than just that one act of civil disobedience.

We've broken her story into two parts. We get lots of messages from listeners outside the U.S. telling us they'd like a little more context when we talk about segregation and the civil rights movement. So today's episode begins with a brief overview of the U.S. between the 1860s and the 1950s, then takes us through to that fateful day on a Montgomery bus. In Wednesday's episode, we'll talk about how the boycott unfolded and what Rosa's life was like after it was over.

Our listener mail is from Amelia about our Mendez v. Westminster episode.

For more knowledge: How the Civil Rights Movement Worked

Episode link: Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott Part 1

My research:

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