Show Notes: Christina of Sweden

Tracy Wilson

Portrait of Queen Christina as a child. Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images

When Christina of Sweden was born, her mother and father, Queen Consort Maria Eleonora and King Gustav, had been trying for more than five years to have a male heir. In that time, the Queen had given birth to two stillborn babies, and the couple had lost another child while she was still an infant. So it may have been wishful thinking when Christina was born and the midwives joyfully declared her to be a boy. In the end, her father decided to set the stage for her to become queen, and had her educated as a prince. And she did assume the throne - although she didn't stay put for very long.

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Episode link: Christina of Sweden

My research:

  • Biermann, Veronica. "The Virtue of a King and the Desire of a Woman? Mythological Representations in the Collection of Queen Christina." Art History. Vol. 24. No. 2. April 2001.
  • Buckley, Veronica. "Christina, Queen of Sweden: The Restless Life of a European Eccentric." Fourth Estate, an imprint of HarperCollins. 2004.
  • Cavendish, Richard. "Abdication of Queen Christina of Sweden." History Today. Vol. 54, No. 6. 2004.
  • "Christina". Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2014. Web. 03 Oct. 2014 <<a href="http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/115660/Christina">http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/115660/Christina>.
  • Clarke, M.L. "The Making of a Queen: The Education of Christina of Sweden." History Today. Vol. 28, Issue 4. 1978. http://www.historytoday.com/ml-clarke/making-queen-education-christina-sweden
  • Uzgalis, Bill. "Kristina Wasa, Queen of Sweden (1626-1689)." The History of Western Philosophy. http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/phl302/philosophers/wasa.html

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