Right Now in Stuff You Missed in History Class

First Ladies in Vogue -- Literally

Jane and I have discussed the role of first lady on the Stuff You Missed in History Class podcast. We've explained that the office is an unofficial one (it's mentioned nowhere in the Constitution), and it's a position that a woman falls into by virtu ...

Results are in: Historians Elect Lincoln

After the United States elected Barack Obama as its 43rd president, Historians went to the polls to pick their favorites of the last 42.

Thomas Jefferson, one of America's founding fathers, was a very unorthodox thinker. His revision of the Bible was one of his most controversial projects -- tune into this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn why.

Eva Peron died on July 26, 1952. After a 13-day wake, Dr. Pedro Ara mummified the body -- but it would take more than twenty years to bury the corpse. Learn more about Eva Peron's decades-long travel to the grave in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.

The Mayan empire produced a unique calendar that's still followed in parts of the world today. Curiously, this calendar predicts a monumental, world-wide change on December 21st, 2012. Learn more about 2012 in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.

During World War II, Axis and Allied powers struggled to discover the enemies' information while hiding their own. Tune in to this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn how the Navajo code talkers turned the tide of World War II.

The Underground Railroad may have saved as much as 100,000 slaves. Tune into to this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn how the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act and a secret network of abolitionists led to the creation of the Underground Railroad.

Like any other discipline, history often becomes a matter of interpretation. Check in with HowStuffWorks' resident history experts as they explore the phenomenon of revisionist history in this podcast.

In most films Vikings are depicted as bloodthirsty, relatively ignorant berserkers who did little more than plunder and pillage their way across Europe. However, the story doesn't end there -- tune in to this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more.

Building on an earlier examination of the Spanish Inquisition, HowStuffWorks' history experts take a look at the disturbing world of medieval torture devices. Check out this podcast to learn more about torture and more Stuff You Missed in History Class.

How the Civil Rights Movement Worked

Explore the complicated history of the civil rights movement in this HowStuffWorks podcast.

Nowadays, the Spanish Inquisition is best known as a symbol of religious intolerance and extreme cruelty. Tune in to this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the people and politics behind the Spanish Inquisition.

During World War II, the bravery of Kamikaze pilots was legendary. When the war concluded, several Japanese soldiers remained in hiding on islands across the Pacific. Learn more about Japanese holdouts and the Bushido code in this HowStuffWorks podcast.

Author Gavin Menzies believes a fleet of Chinese explorers reached the Americas before Christopher Columbus, but he's been repeatedly challenged to defend this claim. Check out this podcast from HowStuffWorks to learn more about revisionist history.

When Lincoln delivered the Emancipation Proclamation, he hoped to demoralize the South. Learn the details behind President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.

Several treasure hunters think they might have found Nazi gold. Learn about the history of Nazi gold, the role of Swiss banks and much more in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.

The Great Wall of China is incredibly long, and was originally built for military purposes. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the Great Wall.

Agent Orange was a potent herbicide and defoliant used across Vietnam during the Vietnam War. Listen to this podcast from HowStuffWorks to learn about Agent Orange and its atrocious legacy.

Marco Polo was an 11th-century Italian explorer famous for his extensive travels through China along the Silk Road, but it can be difficult to separate the truth from the fiction in his stories. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more.

Diamond were first found in Africa sometime in the 1860s, and have troubled the continent ever since. Check out this podcast from HowStuffWorks to learn more about the De Beers monopoly, blood diamonds and the African conflicts resulting from these gems.