Right Now in Stuff You Missed in History Class

The first Crusade began in 1095, and launched a struggle for control of Jerusalem in a series of arduous battles spanning more than two centuries. Learn more about the origin, escalation and consequences of the Crusades in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.

What was Australia's Stolen Generation?

When British explorers reached Australia in 1768, Aborigines were seen as savages in need of assimilation. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the Lost Generation, and the laws Australia passed to force assimilation on the Aborigines.

How the Louisiana Purchase Worked

When Thomas Jefferson purchased the Louisiana Territory for 15 million dollars, the US nearly doubled in size. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the effects of the Louisiana Purchase.

How Presidential Salaries Work

Compared to the average American salary, the President is well-off. However, most Presidents are wealthy when they arrive in office. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the fact and fiction surrounding the President's salary.

How the Swing States Works

During presidential elections, campaign coverage often focuses on states whose populations are divided between candidates. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the fact and fiction surrounding the electoral college and swing states.

Why did Lady Godiva take a naked horse ride?

In an argument over taxing peasants, Lady Godiva -- whose real name was actually Godgifu -- called her husband's bluff and rode naked through the marketplace. Or did she? learn more about the fact and fiction surrounding Lady Godiva in this podcast.

How can a corpse be incorruptible?

Within hours after death, decay usually sets in and the human body begins to rot. However, some human bodies simply don't seem to decompose, and scientists have yet to figure out why. Check out this podcast to learn more about incorruptible corpses.

What happened to the lost colony at Roanoke?

In 1587, English colonists in Roanoke mysteriously disappeared, leaving only a few cryptic clues behind. For centuries since, researchers have wondered what became of the lost colonists. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more.

Do political parties influence the First Lady's duties?

The role of First Lady is extraconstitutional, and the functions of this position have varied across administrations. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the influence political parties may have on the role of the First Lady.

Was an Irish monk the first European to find America?

Although Columbus is often thought to be the first European in America, an Irish monk may have reached the New World in the sixth century. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the fact and fiction surrounding St. Brendan.

How Presidential Pardons Work

The U.S. Constitution grants several powers to the President, including the ability to pardon anyone for several types of crime. Learn about the origins of pardons in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.

What was America's first terrorist threat?

When the U.S. was still a young nation, the notorious Barbary pirates demanded tribute from countries across the world. Rumor has it that President Jefferson was the first to stand up to the pirates. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more.

Does my vote count?

The framers of the Constitution put the electoral college in place as a compromise, and ever since voters have wondered if their vote counts. Check out this podcast from HowStuffWorks to learn more about the fact and fiction of the electoral college.

Did someone really escape from Alcatraz?

Alcatraz was one of the United States' most notorious prisons -- isolated on an island and surrounded by sharks. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the fact and fiction surrounding escape attempts at Alcatraz.

The History of Presidential Debates

In the United States, the presidential debate is a time-honored institution. Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to as our staff writers trace the fact and fiction surrounding presidential debates.

Did Marie Antoinette really tell French peasants to eat cake?

Marie Antoinette was only ten when Rousseau published the famous 'let them eat cake' quote. Check out our HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about what this statement actually meant -- whether or not Marie actually said it.

How the Symbols of U.S. Political Parties Work

A donkey and an elephant are the symbols of the U.S. Democratic and Republican parties, but how were these symbols chosen? Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn more about the fact and fiction surrounding America's political symbols.

Why is there an underground city beneath Beijing?

The Beijing underground city may sound like the stuff of legends, but it's a real place built to escape Soviets. Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn more about the fact and fiction surrounding the city underneath Beijing.

How Thomas Jefferson Worked

Thomas Jefferson's life was peppered with accomplishments -- but what about the disparity between his public image and private life? Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn more about the fact and fiction surrounding Thomas Jefferson.

Who was America's first murderer?

John Billington was one of the signers of the Mayflower Compact -- he was also the first American murder. Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn about the fact and fiction surrounding America's first murderer.