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Native American history

Edmonia Lewis

 Edmonia Lewis

The American sculptor was a celebrated artist in her day, but she receded from the spotlight; her final years remained a mystery for quite some time. See more »

The Dakota War of 1862 and the Whitestone Hill Massacre

 The Dakota War of 1862 and the Whitestone Hill Massacre

In 1862, murder led to war between the Dakota and the United States. What followed was a campaign of retribution against multiple indigenous peoples. See more »

The Orphan Tsunami

 The Orphan Tsunami

In January of 1700, a tsunami struck the coast of Japan. It took a while -- a long while -- to figure out where the catalyzing earthquake had been. See more »

St. Clair's Defeat, or the Battle of a Thousand Slain

 St. Clair's Defeat, or the Battle of a Thousand Slain

In 1791, a confederation of Native American tribes destroyed about half of the American army. The catalyst for that conflict was a lengthy period in which unfair treaties, biased against native peoples, were all too common. See more »

Olive Oatman

 Olive Oatman

In 1851, Olive Oatman's family was attacked while traveling near the Gila River in Arizona. Olive was taken by her attackers, and lived for five years with Native Americans before being ransomed by the U.S. government. See more »

Archaeology Interview: Harvard Indian College

 Archaeology Interview: Harvard Indian College

Holly chats with archaeologists Patricia Capone and Diana Loren about Harvard’s Indian College, the school’s importance to Colonial history and the ongoing archaeology of Harvard Yard. See more »

The Sham Battle and the Cochecho Massacre

 The Sham Battle and the Cochecho Massacre

It was half performance for the British troops, and half actual sham, and it led to an attack on Dover by the Pennacook tribe in 1689. See more »

Poverty Point

 Poverty Point

Poverty Point is a collection of earthwork mounds and ridges situated next to Bayou Maçon in Louisiana. It has features that make it unique among Native American sites, and there are still many questions surrounding its purpose and construction. See more »

Maria Tallchief

 Maria Tallchief

This Native American dancer was the first grand ballerina of the United States. Through her partnership with famed choreographer George Balanchine, she helped shape ballet in America and served as an inspiration for artists from all backgrounds. See more »

The Heathen School

 The Heathen School

The Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Connecticut was founded with the plan that it would draw young men from world cultures, educate them, convert them to Christianity, and then send them back to their native lands to spread their newfound religion. See more »