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Biographies

Copernicus

In addition to being an astronomer, Copernicus was also a mathematician, a doctor, and wrote a manuscript on devaluation of currency. See more »

Abbott and Costello, Part 2

Abbott and Costello made it big in Hollywood during WWII, but the later part of their career together was beset by tragedy and problems. See more »

Abbott and Costello, Part 1

The comedy team of Abbott and Costello created some of the most memorable sketches in history. Part 1 covers their rise to fame. See more »

Walt Whitman, Poet of Democracy

Whitman is often touted as the best and most important poet in U.S. history, but he also worked as a teacher and a journalist. And his poetry career didn't start out particularly well. See more »

Aphra Behn, Writer and Spy

There's really not a lot concretely known about the life of Aphra Behn, who was the first woman in English literature to have made her living writing. See more »

Mongolian Princess Khutulun

Khutulun's story is a little bit cloudy. It's many hundreds of years old, and accounts of her life involve both propaganda and an outsider’s view. See more »

Jules Cotard and the Syndrome Named After Him

Jules Cotard was the first psychiatrist to write about the cluster of symptoms that would come to be called “Walking Corpse Syndrome.” But his work was unfinished, and left a great deal of room for debate about it among his colleagues. See more »

Lady Jane Grey, the Nine-day Queen

For a very short time between Edward VI and Mary I, Lady Jane was, at least nominally, Queen of England and Ireland. See more »

Ira Frederick Aldridge, Famous Unknown Shakespearean

He was one of the first Americans to achieve fame as a Shakespearean actor, and the first black man to do so. See more »

Lucille Ball

Lucille Ball was known for comedy, but worked in modeling, radio and film, as well as television. See more »