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Thanks to his enduring presence in western culture, the name King Arthur conjures up a very specific image. Take a look at our HowStuffWorks podcast to learn more about the fact and fiction surround King Arthur. See more »

Known today as Egypt, Kemet is one of the longest-lived cultures in the world. The great Greek scholars studied at the Kemetic temple-universities, and based their learning on the Kemetic system. Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn more. See more »

How the Great Train Robbery Worked

On the night of August 8, 1963, a gang of thieves stole bank notes worth the equivalent of $50 million. Take a look at our HowStuffWorks article to learn more about the fact and fiction surrounding the great train robbery. See more »

Vlad Tepes, a 15th-century Wallachian prince, was the notoriously blood-thirsty basis for Dracula, Bram Stoker's classic gothic horror character. Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn more about Vlad Tepes. See more »

While stranded in the Sierra Nevada mountains, members of the Donner Party resorted to cannibalism in an effort to survive the harsh winter of 1846. Learn more about the fact and fiction of the Donner Party legend in our HowStuffWorks article. See more »

The Berlin Wall divided a country and a city, but it had a purpose. Learn more about its history and how JFK and Barack Obama fit into the picture in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com. See more »

On July 7, 2007, the new seven wonders of the world were chosen by more than 100 million voters. But whatever happened to the original seven? Take a look at our HowStuffWorks article, 'How the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World Work,' to learn more. See more »

During the Cold War, both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. stockpiled weapons, eventually holding enough power to destroy the world several times over. Yet neither side actually used these weapons. Learn more about M.A.D. in our article on HowStuffWorks. See more »

Al Capone was a king among criminals, and 'kept his hands clean,' maintaining plausible deniability by avoiding direct connections to illegal activity. He never paid taxes -- and this came back to haunt him. Learn more in our article on HowStuffWorks. See more »

When the Spanish Coast Guard caught English Captain Jenkins smuggling, they cut off his ear as punishment. Could this insult have sent two countries to war? Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn whether this is fact or fiction. See more »