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Right Now in Stuff You Missed in History Class

 Did the ancient Greeks get their ideas from the Africans?

Known today as Egypt, Kemet is one of the longest-lived cultures in the world. The great Greek scholars studied at the Kemetic temple-universities, and based their learning on the Kemetic system. Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn more. See more »

How the Great Train Robbery Worked

 How the Great Train Robbery Worked

On the night of August 8, 1963, a gang of thieves stole bank notes worth the equivalent of $50 million. Take a look at our HowStuffWorks article to learn more about the fact and fiction surrounding the great train robbery. See more »

 Vlad Tepes: Who was the real Count Dracula?

Vlad Tepes, a 15th-century Wallachian prince, was the notoriously blood-thirsty basis for Dracula, Bram Stoker's classic gothic horror character. Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn more about Vlad Tepes. See more »

 How the Donner Party Worked

While stranded in the Sierra Nevada mountains, members of the Donner Party resorted to cannibalism in an effort to survive the harsh winter of 1846. Learn more about the fact and fiction of the Donner Party legend in our HowStuffWorks article. See more »

 How the Berlin Wall Worked

The Berlin Wall divided a country and a city, but it had a purpose. Learn more about its history and how JFK and Barack Obama fit into the picture in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com. See more »

 How the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World Work

On July 7, 2007, the new seven wonders of the world were chosen by more than 100 million voters. But whatever happened to the original seven? Take a look at our HowStuffWorks article, 'How the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World Work,' to learn more. See more »

 What's Mutual Assured Destruction?

During the Cold War, both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. stockpiled weapons, eventually holding enough power to destroy the world several times over. Yet neither side actually used these weapons. Learn more about M.A.D. in our article on HowStuffWorks. See more »

 Why was tax evasion the only thing pinned on Al Capone?

Al Capone was a king among criminals, and 'kept his hands clean,' maintaining plausible deniability by avoiding direct connections to illegal activity. He never paid taxes -- and this came back to haunt him. Learn more in our article on HowStuffWorks. See more »

 Why did England and Spain fight over an ear?

When the Spanish Coast Guard caught English Captain Jenkins smuggling, they cut off his ear as punishment. Could this insult have sent two countries to war? Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn whether this is fact or fiction. See more »

 Did Nero really play the fiddle while Rome burned?

In A.D. 64, a great fire consumed Rome for six days and seven nights. Some rumors speculated that Nero set the fire, and even played a fiddle as the city burned. Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn if this is fact or fiction. See more »

 Why was Davy Crockett king of the wild frontier?

Davy Crockett is one of America's great real-life legends. With a little help from Walt Disney, Crockett experienced a resurgence in popularity more than 100 years after his death. Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn if this is fact or fiction. See more »

 What was the Christmas Truce?

Amid the bloodshed of World War I, the Pope pled for a truce on Christmas Day. The commanding powers refused the truce, but soldiers across Europe crossed battle lines to spend Christmas the enemy. Check out our HowStuffWorks article to learn more. See more »

 How the First Olympics Worked

The first Olympics took place in the sixth century in order to build diplomacy across the Greek world. Learn more about the history of the first Olympics in this HowStuffWorks.com podcast. See more »

 What was in Peter the Great's cabinet of curiosities?

Peter the Great was a feared leader but also an intellectual. Learn about Peter the Great and Peter the Great's love of academia and collectibles in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com! See more »

 The Cursed Tomb of King Tut

An inscription above King Tutankhamen's burial chamber reads: 'Death will come on swift pinions to those who disturb the rest of the Pharaoh.' This was known as the mummy's curse -- but was it fact, or fiction? Check out this HowStuffWorks podcast to lear See more »

 Ergot and the Salem Witchtrials

Some researchers allege that ergot poisoning may have been responsible for triggering the Salem witchcraft trials -- but is this fact, or fiction? Learn more about ergot and the Salem witch trials in this HowStuffWorks podcast. See more »

 Fact or Fiction: Is D.B. Cooper still alive?

The D.B. Cooper mystery involves the case of Northwest Airlines Flight 305, which was hijacked by a lone man. Learn more about the D.B. Cooper mystery. See more »

 The Elizabeth Bathory Episode: Was a Hungarian countess the world's most prolific serial killer?

Prolific serial killers are reigned in by some specific parameters. Learn more about Elizabeth Bathory and why she was known as "Bloody Mary". See more »

Did Genghis Khan really kill 1,748,000 people in one hour?

 Did Genghis Khan really kill 1,748,000 people in one hour?

Genghis Khan has more death attributed to him than any other person in history. Learn about Genghis Kahn and the siege Genghis Khan conducted on Nishapur. See more »